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Learning Industry News and Opinion

What It Will Take to Lead 20 Years From Now

January 6, 2012 13:46 by vstgerard

(From cbsnews.com) -- If you want to be a leader 20 years from now, you will need to speak more than one language, be willing to work outside your native country, learn to spot talent, and be attuned to climate change.

And that's just for starters! You will also need to master multiple roles -- executive, mentor and fence-mender.

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Categories: News | Research

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Talent management tops company CEOs' task list

June 28, 2011 09:55 by jllorens

(From the Economic Times) BANGALORE/KOLKATA: Whenever Lenovo India's MD Amar Babu is not meeting customers and business partners, his focus is on talent: coaching, team-building and making the right pitch for the right people. "Talent management today tops my agenda and role," he says. People and teams, he knows, are what go into making a successful organisation. "Especially at the middle and senior management levels, it is becoming increasingly difficult to get good talent which matches the company's culture, has execution skills and understands the business," he says.

Increasingly, in a competitive job market, head honchos are called upon to play the role of chief talent officer. Their challenge: Retain the best and build the rest. This is becoming the guiding principle across companies, whether entrepreneurial, professional or family-run. With Indian companies currently in the throes of a high growth trajectory, talent management and talent creation are becoming key responsibilities, says Fortis Global Healthcare Holdings CEO Vishal Bali.

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Categories: Human Capital | International | News

E Learning and developing countries

April 1, 2011 14:56 by jllorens

(From Gerson Lehrman Group) Two of the largest world universities by enrolment exactly lie in the densely populated area of the world, Indira Gandhi National Open University, IGNOU and Allama Iqbal Open University, AIOU, in India and Pakistan respectively. The modus operandi is distance education.

If you look in the sphere of the largest universities by enrolment you will see that developing countries are way ahead in the race. The credit goes to the population but it’s not all about the population itself. It’s also the ease, reliability and convenience.

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South Africa: Nation 'must boost its leadership skills for BRIC'

January 24, 2011 09:08 by jllorens

SA's entry into the BRIC (Brazil, Russia, India, China) group of major emerging economies will demand greater leadership and management skills for it to keep pace with its partners, according to training group AstroTech.

AstroTech CEO Liza van Wyk adds that leadership courses - and those for new managers especially - covering tricky human resources and emotional intelligence issues and export skills were heavily subscribed in 2010.

“Early bookings for 2011 show businesses are still concerned about the level of expertise of new managers. And managers in turn are concerned about the skills capacity of staff.”

Van Wyk says BRIC countries have very hard-working, low unionised and highly skilled workers that in most instances earn less than their South African counterparts.

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Categories: News | T+D

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Germany to tackle skills shortage

October 18, 2010 19:03 by jllorens

(From Reuters) BERLIN - The German government wants to tackle a growing shortage of skilled workers by tapping a pool of foreigners unable to practise their professions because their credentials are not recognised, a minister said.

Education Minister Annette Schavan told the Financial Times Deutschland newspaper there are some 300,000 foreign residents in Germany with skills that they cannot use because qualifications from their homelands are not recognised.

She said the government would like to pass a law this year to speed up the authentication process for foreigners. Many with medical, engineering and other degrees often work in jobs requiring lesser skills because credentials are not recognised.

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Categories: International | News

Language: A skill, not a weakness--- Commentary

July 12, 2010 19:23 by jllorens

(From latimes.com) Learning more than one language is a 21st century skill. It provides students with economic opportunities across the globe and at home. Many students enter our schools fluent in a language other than English. They speak Spanish, Chinese, Japanese, Farsi, Arabic, Khmer and dozens of other languages important in international trade. They come with a resource.

Ideally, these students — more than 1.5 million in California who enter school speaking a language other than English — would gain English proficiency while enhancing their home language skills. They would graduate from high school fully bilingual or multilingual and ready to compete in the global marketplace.

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Cisco, AIESEC Open International Exchange for Malaysian Students

August 12, 2009 12:45 by jllorens

Cisco (NASDAQ: CSCO) and AIESEC, the world's largest student-run organization, have launched an innovative program to provide Malaysian students with the opportunity to expand their skills and gain valuable international work experience. The initiative is in line with the Malaysian government's call for more public-private sector collaboration to support the education and development of a highly skilled, technology-savvy workforce that can compete in the global arena.

Open to qualified students currently enrolled in the Cisco® Networking Academy® program, the professional internship program will transform the selected students' classroom knowledge to practical work-based skills. The internships vary in duration from six to 18 months.

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Survey: Global Companies' HR Moving in the Right Direction, Could Still Improve

August 12, 2009 11:55 by jllorens

LINCOLNSHIRE, Ill.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--As business globalization and cross-border trade and investments have accelerated over the last decade, companies have a more globally dispersed workforce than ever before. According to a new survey by Hewitt Associates, a global human resources consulting and outsourcing company, human resources (HR) departments have made steady progress in their ability to support the shift toward a more global business model and workforce. Yet, for many companies, questions remain on how exactly HR should be aligned from a strategy, organizational and delivery perspective. This issue is even more pressing in the current economic environment, as HR departments are being challenged to improve the effectiveness of their global HR programs and reduce global HR delivery costs.

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Uganda: 1,000 women get business skills

August 3, 2009 11:41 by jllorens

OVER 1,000 rural businesswomen have been trained in entrepreneurial, management and leadership skills.

Twenty-one selected women groups from across the country also got business counselling and advisory services.

The training was conducted under Enterprise Uganda’s Strengthening Women Entrepreneurs Project (SWEP), a report indicated.

“The training has improved the operational efficiency of the women-owned enterprises and increased revenue collection,” the report said.

It added that household incomes of the rural women, purchasing power and jobs had increased because of the women’s involvement in economic activities.

“This has improved Uganda’s balance of payments because of increased export of locally-produced goods. This has also improved food security.”

Enterprise Uganda said as a result of the training, four women groups were engaged in agro-processing, while seven were involved in crop husbandry. “Seven others are involved animal husbandry, while three are engaged in making textiles, arts and crafts.

“We conducted business health checks on all the groups to identify their strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats,” reads the report, adding, “The common challenges we discovered included limited entrepreneurial skills, lack of capital, weak group management structures and leadership, lack of strategic planning and market access.”

Read it here.


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Worldwide, lack of skills remains the basic problem

August 3, 2009 10:38 by jllorens

(From The Times) Global research commissioned by KPMG reveals that the economic slowdown has cooled the overheated project market to some extent, especially for large physical projects.

But the research finds that there are still fundamental problems with undercapacity.

“The performance of many projects has not been good as a result,” said Jeff Shaw, director for major projects at KPMG. “There is a shortage of skilled project managers globally, which has been alleviated only temporarily during the recession.

“We cannot rely on importing skills and it’s still expensive to cherry- pick, so we have to develop home-grown project managers.

“There is considerable concern about the industry’s ability to deliver on infrastructure requirements around the world in the medium term,” Shaw added.

“Our advice is that if projects repeatedly form part of your core business you ought to build a core capacity to have internal skills to deliver. Then, outsource to supplement your capacity during peaks as a one-off.

“Government is a particularly significant problem area; our research shows that, globally, 70% of infrastructure providers (whoever feeds into major projects) cite a lack of government effectiveness as a major constraint on delivery.”

Shaw said this was not the case in South Africa alone — in the US the rate was 72%.

Read the entire article. 


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