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Learning Industry News and Opinion

Tablets Make their Way into the Workplace: Email and Note Taking are Most Popular Business Uses

February 14, 2012 13:30 by Ann Pace

(From PRWEB) -- The tablet has been the hottest device in the consumer market since Apple’s 2010 iPad launch. Yet over the past year, tablet use has begun to crossover from the consumer world into the workplace. New NPD In-Stat research confirms that the most common business uses of tablets are email/calendar management, note taking, and presentations, with 77% reporting email as a common workplace use.

“Email is by far the most dominant tablet application for business users,” says Frank Dickson, VP Mobile Research. “However, when you dig into the data, you find a plethora of strong niche uses arising. When business tablet users are asked to list ALL the applications they use, note taking, for example, is listed as the second most popular application. However, when survey respondents are asked to only select their most important uses, note taking is at the bottom of that list. In addition to email, customer relationship management and IT network intelligence are listed as ‘most important’ uses.”

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Apple, AT&T Pushing Tablets into the Workplace

October 20, 2010 21:37 by jllorens

(From www.itbusinessedge.com) Apple, of course, did not invent the tablet, but its tremendously successful iPad launch has taken the class of device, which previously had been struggling for face time like a B-list singer at a charity sing-along, and made it a star.

The next phase is upon us. AT&T said late last week that the iPad will be sold to corporate clients. This, according to the InformationWeek story, is unique: AT&T's move marks the first time a vendor has positioned the iPad as a business tool. Analysts said the strategy is likely to pay dividends as companies look to offer their employees computing tools that mirror those they use in their personal lives.

The traction tablets have gotten from informal use in the marketplace is in verticals such as health care and retail, in which people are highly mobile, especially within a building or campus. It will be interesting to see whether AT&T and Apple, and the carriers/vendors that will inevitably follow, will market to the most apt verticals or take a broader approach.

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Categories: News | T+D

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Cortado Workplace for iPad Delivers Desktop Functionality and Real Mobile Printing

September 30, 2010 09:47 by jllorens

(From dabcc.com) Mobile business expert Cortado today announced the launch of its free cloud desktop application, Cortado Workplace for iPad. The application provides users with central cloud storage for files and documents that can be managed via the app or launched directly with the relevant Office application. In addition, documents can be printed from the iPad to the nearest printer. Cortado's cloud printing process works without relying on a PC or Mac and currently supports more than 10,000 different printer models and all common document types.

Cortado Workplace app enhances the iPad with desktop and cloud printing functionalities for the mobile user.  With the Cortado Workplace app for iPad, managing files and mobile printing is easy without running additional applications on a switched-on computer. In addition, users are no longer limited to printing only photos and do not have the hindrance of a limited number of printer models that are supported for mobile printing. Even Apple’s recently announced AirPrint cannot deliver this type of mobile freedom.

Unique to the industry, with Cortado Workplace iPad users can now print documents on any printer connected to the device via Wi-Fi. More than 6,000 different printer drivers on file in the Cortado hosting center allow access to around 10,000 different printer models. The app supports all file formats, including all Office and graphics programs.

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Will the Macmillan/Amazon dustup be a boon for the new Apple iPad?

February 2, 2010 11:50 by Tora Estep

Last week, schoolyard bully Amazon pounded on plucky Macmillan Publishers by disabling the buy buttons on nearly all editions of all its books, thus cutting off access to one of the publisher’s and its authors’ biggest markets. Why? Because Macmillan had the temerity to tell Amazon that it would provide access to its ebooks only if it switched to an agency model in which Amazon would make 30 percent of the proceeds of ebooks and Macmillan would set the prices (up to $15 per title). (Amazon wants to cap the price of ebooks at $9.99 and stick with its current model of buying at 50 percent of publisher cost and setting its own price.)

The media reaction to this event was generally to cast Amazon in the role of bully (for a sample, see this article from Fast Company) and thus Amazon was forced to back down.

The entire event set off a lot of talk about a prominent issue in the book industry: what is a fair price for ebooks? They are still pretty new, so no one really knows for sure what makes sense. The assumption has been that they don't really cost much to make, but that's not completely accurate (for a discussion of the costs of making books, check out Tobias Buckell's thorough discussion on his blog.). Amazon has been willing to operate its ebook business at a loss for a few years in order to dominate the market, but now all of a sudden here comes Apple’s iPad and iBooks and all bets are off. The entry of the iPad and iBooks suggests the potential for a fairer share of ebook proceeds for publishers and for authors, although at first glance it may seem to come at a loss for consumers. But does it? Cheaper isn't always better if you want to create the conditions that allow authors and publishers to thrive and publish books that matter. Clearly the Author's Guild thinks this is an important fight for the future quality of the publishing industry. To read their take on it, check out this article.

At any rate, the verdict on the pricing structure for ebooks is still out. I'll be interested to see how things shake out.


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Categories: Books

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