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More stuff happening at #TK11

February 4, 2011 14:10 by Tora Estep

So I started trying to capture some of what was coming out of ASTD TechKnowledge 2011 Conference and Exposition on Twitter yesterday, but so much is happening that I ran out of time. Here's some more information to report from there (for more collections of backchannel info, check out Misadventures in Learning):

  • Well, ASTD got a couple of digs about the use of paper-based evaluations for TK. I guess we'll need to think about that for upcoming conferences!
  • Michael Allen had a session about instructional design that generated a lot of comments (what's really cool is that he is going to do a book for us called Leaving ADDIE Behind that will be coming out later this year! Because I will be working on that book, expect to hear about it here!). Some representative comments:
    • The "rules" get in the way of learning. Who's to say how long it takes or what path students should take to learning?
    • People want to "do" things, not read about doing things.
    • We need to create experiences, not instruction.
    • ESD instead of ISD.
    • A lot of people were asking, "Is ISD dying as an instructional design tool?" Seems like Allen may be saying it is.
    • What's the last thing learners should be doing, and in what context? Then ask, what challenges will learners face?
  • Several comments came out of Marc Rosenberg's session on managing organizational knowledge in the age of Web 2.0:
    • KM is getting knowledge from people who have it to people who need it.
    • Most of what you know is NOT on the internet. It's in your head. Social applied to the internet makes it easier to get it out.
    • Most companies can't surface the creativity and knowledge their people have.
    • When you produce and consume information on the internet, you care about the quality and can easily weed out the crap stuff.
    • Training can extinguish people's ability; learning to learn.  
    • Stop waiting for this to be perfected. It will never be perfected.
    • Moving beyond elearning to eknowledge. Think big, start small.
  • Anders Gronstedt's session about using games, social media, and virtual worlds in the workplace got several comments:
    • Points, badges, levels, time-pressure, challenges, and rewards to engage.
    • Use gamification to get unstuck from the academic paradigm.
    • Skillset may be different but cost is transferable when designing in virtual worlds or using video.
    • Moving role play from classroom to virtual environment giving much better results.
    • Being inside the data lets you see patterns you wouldn't otherwise see.
    • No one ever logged in to Webex just to hang out. They do in virtual worlds.

Actually, just a general reading of the Twitter feed illustrates different ways that it can be used. A lot of people obviously signed up for Twitter for the first time and started asking questions about how to use it. @stevier and @TerrenceWing, obviously long time users of Twitter, explained that you have to use Twitter to really understand its value and arrranged a Tweetup at a nearby bar. @TerrenceWing and @ASTD pointed to The ASTD TechKnowledge Daily, an online newspaper reporting what's going on every day at TK11. Some folks missed meet to eat, so they made other arrangements. And a lot of people who weren't able to make it to the conference commented that they were glad to be able to get in some of the action through Twitter. So there are a few things you can get from Twitter: basically live reports of the action, opportunities to meet virtually and in reality with people, and tons of information from multiple sources.  

And that's going to be it for what's going on at TK (at least as viewed through Twitter) for today, but I will get back with some more summaries and comments on Monday! Have a great weekend, and safe travels to all conference attendees! Oh, and I almost forgot, for those of you who want more or weren't able to make to the conference, all is not lost! You can still sign up for the Virtual Conference!  


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Categories: Celebrity Bloggers | TechKnowledge

Creating a Culture of Innovation

October 8, 2010 17:06 by jllorens

(From Gallup Management Journal) Since the Industrial Revolution, there have been three main business innovations. The first was neoclassical economics to drive a supply-and-demand economy. The second occurred in the 1980s and 1990s when companies like Toyota, GE, and others used process improvement (Six Sigma, lean manufacturing) to drive profitability and growth.

In today's marketplace, these models no longer provide the competitive advantage they once did. So the third major business model will be the driver of innovation moving forward. This model is behavioral economics.

Whether these three models were product driven, knowledge driven, or innovation driven, one thing remains constant: They all need people and managers. To execute, you must choose to use people as allies rather than adversaries. Behavioral economics is the science that allows this to occur. There are three mechanisms or levers that an organization can pull to drive innovation using behavioral economic principles. They are culture measurements, capability assessments, and selection of the idea catalysts (the organization's people).

Read more.


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Categories: News | T+D

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CIOs Gain Influence Globally During Great Recession

May 13, 2010 13:30 by Ann Pace

(From Business Wire) -- In a global survey of CIOs undertaken by Harvey Nash / PA Consulting Group, 71 percent of participants revealed their roles were becoming more strategic and, for the first time since the survey began in 1998, more than half said that they sit on the operational boards for their companies.

Moreover the survey revealed that for many, the recession acted as a catalyst for the IT department to prove its value to the business, with three-quarters successfully demonstrating cost savings and operational efficiencies to their CEO in the last 12 months. Additionally, demonstrating a sense of obligation to their organization, more than 70 percent of respondents indicated a willingness to consider a salary freeze or cut to improve the organization’s financial stability.

But increasing influence has not been accompanied by a rise in job satisfaction, and significant variances in how CIOs are remunerated throughout the world suggest that the most talented technology executives may look to change jobs when the economy begins to pick up. Globally, a full 43 percent of CIOs expect to be in a new job within 24 months; the number for U.S.-based CIOs is 38 percent.

Read more.

For more information on the role of CIOs, consider attending the session Harvesting Expert Knowledge at the ASTD 2010 International Conference and Exposition!


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PeopleCube Predicts Five Business Trends for 2010

January 26, 2010 11:49 by jllorens

FRAMINGHAM, Mass.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--PeopleCube, provider of intelligent workplace management technology, today foretold five business trends that it believes will emerge—or continue to gain ground—in 2010. These include capturing actual utilization of space to better understand corporate real-estate requirements, leveraging workplace business intelligence to gain insight into current and future space needs, implementing alternative workspace programs for economic and environmental benefits, leveraging video conferencing to facilitate collaboration while minimizing costs and energy usage, and continuing adoption of the software-as-a-service (SaaS) delivery model for quicker ROI with less risk.

 

Read more.

 


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