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5 Ways Young Professionals Want to Be Led

March 13, 2012 13:00 by Ann Pace

(From Forbes) -- Recently, my organization facilitated a roundtable session with fifteen young professionals. Their main concern was how to advance in a multi-generational workplace. Several of these young professionals felt that they didn’t belong or fit in their workplace; they were uncertain about who to trust and didn’t respect the manner in which they were being led. These young professionals were eager to learn the best ways their generation could take control, influence their workplace culture and start performing at the highest levels. They wanted to get noticed, create impact and at the same time discover how to start generating more income and accelerate their advancement.

This three hour roundtable was intense, but we successfully identified what these young professionals were really looking for: how to most effectively teach their baby boomer bosses how they seek to be led. As one young professional said, “if my boss understands how I am wired to work, I will not only teach the organization’s old guard how to lead my generation, but my performance will help contribute to the organization’s success. I will make them more relevant.” This confident perspective changed the conversation and helped to define the following top five ways young professionals want to be led by their baby boomer bosses.

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Employees would rather suffer a hangover or receive a credit card bill than talk to their boss, global survey shows

February 9, 2012 15:30 by Ann Pace

(From HRmagazine.co.uk) -- Leaders lack empathy with their staff, have poor leadership skills and that a third of them are ineffective, according to global research published this morning by talent management firm DDI.

The report found one in three respondents (34%) only sometimes or never consider their leader to be effective, and over a third (37%) are only sometimes or never motivated to give their best by their leader.
 
Lessons for Leaders from the People Who Matter includes data from an online survey undertaken for DDI by Harris Interactive.
 
This polled more than 1,250 full-time employees in non-management positions in the US, UK, Australia, Canada, China, India, Germany and South East Asia (Malaysia, Philippines and Singapore), and found they would rather suffer a bad hangover, do housework or see their credit card bill arrive in the mail than face the prospect of sitting through a performance discussion with their boss. And only 40% of respondents report that their boss never damages their personal self-esteem, leaving 60% saying they do sometimes, most of the time or always.

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Categories: International | News | Research

New Study: Behavioral Capabilities Drive Corporate Performance

February 1, 2012 09:22 by vstgerard

(From Marketwire) -- Organizational capabilities greatly affect long-term corporate success, and none more so than behavioral aspects. According to "Organization of the Future -- Designed to Win: Organizational Capabilities Matter," a new Focus report by The Boston Consulting Group (BCG), behavioral attributes have high impact only when they're backed by strong structural capabilities.

The study, conducted in partnership with 12 management organizations worldwide, surveyed approximately 1,600 senior managers, seeking their input on a framework of 20 organizational capabilities -- both structural and behavioral.

The correlations showed that all 20 types of organizational capabilities have an impact on overall performance -- though clearly some have much more influence than others. "There's a definite bias toward behavioral factors -- in particular, leadership, employee engagement, and cross-functional collaboration," said research leader Fabrice Roghe, a Duesseldorf-based partner at BCG. "But the best performance comes when those traits are backed by structural capabilities, such as a strong organization design and rigorous business processes and controls."

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Categories: Research

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How Social Business Leaders Lead: Talent Management and Recruiting

January 26, 2012 12:00 by Ann Pace

(From Forbes.com) -- Talent management gets a great deal of attention in social business particularly in the human resources department. Fundamentally, it is a question of if talent acquisition and personnel development are changing dramatically in the light of huge jumps in connectivity through social networks as ways to find jobs and learn from others. If there are changes to how businesses work with talent, what might they be? At Enterprise2.0 conference Santa Clara, I caught up with Tim Young, the former CEO of Socialcast, and now VP of Social Enterprise at VMware to ask this question (following my prior post on Mr. Young’s thoughts).

*Note: This is a continuation of my series, How Social Business Leaders Lead, focusing on how leaders of existing social businesses are evolving their own skills, along with their views of future models of work, the evolving nature of management, and the evolving structure of the organization.

Rawn Shah: What do organizations do for talent management?

Tim Young: “I think, a lot of companies today will tell you ‘We spend a lot of money to hire the best talent,’ [or] ‘We spend a lot of money to retain our best talent,’ but when you ask what do [they] do in between those two junctures to develop that talent, there’s not a lot going on. I think organizations [that] recognize that opportunity to develop people, really develop their people, not just send them to a seminar every month, but actually really develop that talent and nurture them. Those are the organizations where people really want to work.”

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Will a Government Re-Org Work? That Depends.

January 13, 2012 15:24 by Kristen Fyfe

News today that President Obama asked Congress to grant him the power to streamline parts of the federal government may sound familiar to those familiar with The Public Manager, a quarterly journal ASTD publishes that focuses on federal government leadership that works. The very topic was addressed in the Summer 2011 issue that featured a 28-page Forum focused on government reorganization.

"Whatever structure eventually emerges, President Obama will want affected employees to change their past behavior to achieve the new goals and objectives," wrote Robert Tobias, in his article titled "Leading Differently: Can Reorganization Change Things?"

Sounds like learning professionals in the federal government might have their work cut out for them.

You can read more of Tobias's article here. It follows an introductory piece by Alan Balutis.

 

 


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Categories: Government

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What It Will Take to Lead 20 Years From Now

January 6, 2012 13:46 by vstgerard

(From cbsnews.com) -- If you want to be a leader 20 years from now, you will need to speak more than one language, be willing to work outside your native country, learn to spot talent, and be attuned to climate change.

And that's just for starters! You will also need to master multiple roles -- executive, mentor and fence-mender.

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Categories: News | Research

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Five Workplace Trends for 2012

December 15, 2011 12:30 by Ann Pace

(From Talent Management) -- The recession has impacted how individuals view work and the workplace. Though it may appear little has changed as employees who’ve managed to keep their jobs hunker down, try not to get noticed and wait things out, the workplace continues to evolve as new trends emerge. Leaders must proactively address these trends to ensure their organizations evolve toward growth.

Here are a few workplace trends talent leaders can expect to see in the upcoming year:

Movement from management principles to leadership values. Employees are savvy, and although they have been relatively quiet waiting for things to return to normal from the recession, they’ve been carefully watching. Cookie-cutter, old-school or command-and-control approaches to managing people are becoming less effective; employees can determine when an organization’s walk doesn’t fit the talk, and they are getting impatient working for managers who are less self-aware than they are. Instead, individuals today must lead with values such as collaboration and shared purpose. By engaging the workforce in a compelling shared vision and engaging their hearts as well as their minds, leaders can reap the best results.

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Blogs: Why Doesn't HR Lead Change?

November 16, 2011 15:15 by jllorens

(From blogs.hbr.org) It's hard to find leaders of the human resources (HR) function who are active in helping their organization improve the way it works. I asked dozens of people who are in HR or in process improvement to share examples of HR change leaders, and I only found a few.

Though it's rare, here's an indicator of what is possible. In 2009 Tony Scibelli, Vice President of Human Resources and Operations at Faxton-St. Luke's Healthcare learned that the Chief Operating Officer and Chief Nursing Officer were going to launch "relationship-based care," a comprehensive cultural change program to focus doctors' and nurses' attention on patients and their families. He offered to have HR involved to address the people aspects. He showed them how HR could weave relationship-based care and continuous improvement into the fabric of this community hospital in central New York, for example by hiring and promoting the right people. He was at the table with them as they planned training and communications, and as they decided how to reward people who took on improvement projects.

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Categories: Communities | Human Capital | News

Blogs: A Female-Dominated Workplace Won't Fix Everything

October 17, 2011 13:55 by jllorens

(From hbr.org) Men on the job must feel besieged. Two seismic shifts are underway that are irrevocably changing the ways in which we've believed work works.

On the one hand, new technologies have enabled neuroscience to discover that men and women tend to be wired differently in ways that incline men — can it be? — to behave more emotionally and irrationally in certain work situations, exploding the myth that women are the only emotional creatures in the workplace. Recent research, like that led by Cambridge University neuroscientist John Coates, suggests that surges in male financial traders' testosterone produce states of euphoria that cause them to understate risk, thus contributing to the overleveraged global financial crash. Since men naturally produce ten times as much testosterone as women, it's being suggested that a more gender-balanced financial workforce could be stabilizing for firms and for the system as a whole.

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Categories: Human Capital | News

For a happier workplace, get beyond the small talk

August 15, 2011 15:23 by jllorens

(From The Globe and Mail) At a time of economic turmoil and increasing consumer anxiety, workplace colleagues can be forgiven for limiting their social contact to small talk. “What’s up?” or “Did you see the game last night?” is unlikely to unleash an angst-ridden response. Whether people are afraid to upset or provoke others, or think that upbeat chatter creates a positive atmosphere, there’s often a Don’t Worry, Be Happy approach to office banter.

But a recent study shows that this may not be such a good thing. Genuinely satisfied people have deeper, more meaningful conversations more often than unhappy people do. “Our data are pretty clear in that the happiest person had 10 per cent of small talk [in their social interactions],” and had twice as many substantive conversations as unhappy people, said Matthias Mehl, a professor of social psychology at the University of Arizona, and lead author of the study.

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