The Official ASTD Blog
Learning Industry News and Opinion

Widening Skills Gap Threatens Employers' Ability to Compete

March 15, 2012 14:30 by Ann Pace

(From PRNewswire) -- Ironic as it may be, despite record-high unemployment and the perception of a surplus of talent, human resources (HR) professionals may be forced to choose from limited quantities of high-skilled workers, a new Deloitte study shows. Moreover, the widening skills gap may put the country's ability to compete globally in a vulnerable position.

The 2012 Top Five Total Rewards Survey from Deloitte and the International Society of Certified Employee Benefit Specialists (ISCEBS) reveals talent as the most significant challenge to organizations over the next three years. One quarter of all survey respondents expressed concerns about talent, particularly the shortage, motivating and retaining talent -- a substantial increase over 16 percent last year. Talent shortage concerns are highest among insurance and professional services firms.

"The survey exposes a widening gap between the dwindling supply of skilled workers in America and the growing demands of the modern workplace," said David Lusk, principal, Deloitte Consulting LLP and author of the report. "A key challenge ahead for employers will be working to help close this skills gap to maintain a competitive edge in the global marketplace."

Read more.


Tags: , ,

Categories: News | Research

Categories: News | Research
Actions: E-mail | Permalink | Comments (0) | Comment RSSRSS comment feed

The Business Impact of Talent Intelligence

March 8, 2012 12:00 by Ann Pace

(From marketwire) -- Taleo Corporation, a global leader of SaaS-based Talent Management solutions, in conjunction with partner Human Capital Institute (HCI), today released a research report on the economics of Talent Intelligence. The report, based on an extensive survey of more than 600 global organizations, examines the far-reaching economic impact of talent intelligence, identifying connections between its use and overall corporate performance. The report reveals the companies that best satisfy the demands of their leaders are those that place heightened importance on and provide greater visibility into workforce data, delivered in a way that empowers managers to make more informed, rapid business decisions. Talent Intelligence remains a key differentiator in today's hyper-competitive world where the human capital of an organization is its principle engine of production.

As the global economy continues its slow recovery and organizations grapple with an uncertain business climate, the ability to define current and future talent needs and vulnerabilities is essential to success. Companies on the leading edge today are using Talent Intelligence in combination with other business information to drive critical decisions. They are leveraging Talent Intelligence technologies to provide historical, current, and predictive views of the workforce and its direct impact on business operations.

Read more.


Tags: , ,

Categories: News | Research

Categories: News | Research
Actions: E-mail | Permalink | Comments (0) | Comment RSSRSS comment feed

Millennials 'Benefit and Suffer' From Hyperconnected Lives

March 5, 2012 12:25 by vstgerard

(From MSNBC) -- Millennials—the always-connected generation, those born between 1981 and 2000—have such a "thirst for instant gratification and quick fixes" that they're at risk of making poor life decisions based on findings from a fast Google search or a text message response from a friend.

That's the worst-case scenario, according to 42 percent of the 1,021 Internet "experts" from think tanks, research groups, corporations and universities queried by the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project and the Imagining the Internet Center at Elon University in a new study, "Millennials will benefit and suffer due to their hyperconnected lives."

Those who are growing up in "today’s networked world and counting on the Internet as their external brain will be nimble analysts and decision-makers who will do well," some experts told Pew. But others "expect that constantly connected teens and young adults will thirst for instant gratification and often make quick, shallow choices."

Read more.

Related articles from T+D:
It’s a Millennial Thing

The Time Has Come to Embrace Millennial Perspectives


Tags:

Categories: News | Research | T+D

Categories: News | Research | T+D
Actions: E-mail | Permalink | Comments (0) | Comment RSSRSS comment feed

How to Build Trust in an Organization

March 1, 2012 14:30 by Ann Pace

(From UNC Kenan-Flagler) -- In a 2001 interview with Fortune magazine about his company’s continued success, Herbert D. Kelleher, founder of Southwest Airlines, attributed much of it to the fact that he always treated his employees like customers. Kelleher knew that employees who are trusted and treated fairly will, in turn, treat their customers with trust and respect.

This is the same kind of philosophy that made Netflix a huge success as a young start-up organization. From the beginning, Netflix founder Reed Hastings knew the kind of company culture he wanted to develop to achieve its purpose. Netflix’s “Freedom and Responsibility Culture” was based on the premise that all employees understand the purpose of the organization and that they know the value customers get from doing business with Netflix. The foundation of that culture is trust and responsibility; trust in its employees to achieve the company’s goals and trust in its customers to act responsibly by eliminating late fees and asking customers to return their DVD rentals when they are ready.

Read the complimentary whitepaper.


Tags: , ,

Categories: News | Research

Categories: News | Research
Actions: E-mail | Permalink | Comments (0) | Comment RSSRSS comment feed

Study: Long-held view of 'bell curve' in performance measurement proven flawed

February 28, 2012 12:45 by Ann Pace

(From Indiana University) -- The dreaded bell curve that has haunted generations of students with seemingly pre-ordained grades has also migrated into business as the standard for assessing employee performance. But it now turns out -- revealed in an expansive, first-of-its-kind study -- that individual performance unfolds not on a bell curve, but on a "power-law" distribution, with a few elite performers driving most output and an equally small group tied to damaging, unethical or criminal activity.

This turns on its head nearly a half-century of plotting performance evaluations on a bell curve, or "normal distribution," in which equal numbers of people fall on either side of the mean. Researchers from Indiana University's Kelley School of Business predict that the findings could force a wholesale re-evaluation of every facet related to recruitment, retention and performance of individual workers, from pre-employment testing to leadership development.

"How organizations hire, maintain and assess their workforce has been built on the idea of normality in performance, which we now know is, in many cases, a complete myth," said author Herman Aguinis, professor of organizational behavior and human resources at Kelley. "If, as our results suggest, a small, elite group is responsible for most of a company's output and success, then it's critical to identify its members early and manage, train and compensate them differently from colleagues. This will require a fundamental shift in mindset and entirely new management tools."

Read more.


Tags: , , ,

Categories: News | Research

Categories: News | Research
Actions: E-mail | Permalink | Comments (0) | Comment RSSRSS comment feed

Delivering performance reviews that work

February 28, 2012 12:30 by Ann Pace

(From HRReporter.com) -- How well does your organization handle performance reviews?

A formal performance evaluation process is quite commonplace these days, especially in larger organizations. But having a process doesn’t mean the approach is firing on all cylinders.

A new study by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) found the vast majority of organizations surveyed – 98 per cent – report having a formal performance evaluation process.

But the study highlighted many gaps in how organizations manage performance reviews, especially with respect to how they engage people managers in the process.

For example only 46 per cent of respondents said they require people managers to be trained on the company’s performance evaluation process, although 44 per cent provide voluntary training for people managers.

Read more.


Tags: , , ,

Categories: News | Research

Categories: News | Research
Actions: E-mail | Permalink | Comments (0) | Comment RSSRSS comment feed

Survey Identifies Company Transparency & Employee Development as Most Sought-After Workplace Practices

February 13, 2012 13:49 by vstgerard

(From Marketwire) -- A survey by Fierce, Inc., a world-class communication training and leadership development company, provides new insight into employees’ perception of workplace practices and the disconnect between the priorities of managers versus employees in terms of workplace communication.

Many employees feel their organization’s workplace practices are ineffective -- an assertion supported by the 44% of survey respondents who claim that their company’s best practices actually hinder employee productivity and morale. In fact, another 47% reported that their organization’s current practices consistently get in the way of desired results, rather than optimize the overall success of the business -- a primary function that a company’s best practices are meant to fulfill.

When asked which practices hold their organization back, nearly 50% of respondents identified a lack of company-wide transparency and too little involvement in company decisions as key areas of concern. In addition, nearly half of survey respondents identified the most beneficial practices as those that encouraged accountability, development, and individual empowerment within the organization.

Nearly 800 corporate executives, employees, and educators across the finance, healthcare, retail, aerospace, and defense sectors were surveyed.

Read more.


Tags:

Categories: Research

Categories: Research
Actions: E-mail | Permalink | Comments (0) | Comment RSSRSS comment feed

New Report Identifies Steps to Ensure More Women in Senior Leadership

February 10, 2012 12:11 by vstgerard

A new report, Women and the Paradox of Power, based on research by Anne Perschel of Germane Consulting and Jane Perdue of Braithwaite Innovation Group finds that corporations are leaving money on the table and forgoing future success by failing to place more women in senior leadership roles. Perschel and Perdue also claim that businesswomen must prepare themselves to take on these executive roles by understanding and using power more effectively.

In their study, which involved hundreds of senior-level businesswomen, Perdue and Perschel find that many women relate to power in ways that prevent them from attaining senior-level positions, be it lack of confidence; cultural conditioning; or simply not understanding what power is. In comparison, interviews with women in senor leadership roles at the highest levels of corporations reveal that they have a different understanding of power and use different approaches to gain more of it. They then use their power and influence to make important changes to the culture and to leadership practices.

Read more.


Tags:

Categories: Research

Categories: Research
Actions: E-mail | Permalink | Comments (0) | Comment RSSRSS comment feed

Where are the High-Potential Leaders?

February 9, 2012 15:30 by Ann Pace

(From IndustryWeek.com) -- According to a survey by Right Management released on Feb. 7, 31% of respondents said their organization lacked high-potential leaders.

Across the board talent was in short supply as well with 23% of respondents citing this as a problem.

"After three years of organizational contraction and less internal investment companies are taking a hard look at their onboard talent and aren't pleased with what they find," said Michael Haid, senior vice president of Talent Management for Right Management. "Lean times make it hard for organizations seeking to recruit, retain or develop future leaders. And they're keenly aware of the tough competitive environment they’re in and the need to hold onto and build leadership."

Read more.


Tags: , , ,

Categories: News | Research

Categories: News | Research
Actions: E-mail | Permalink | Comments (0) | Comment RSSRSS comment feed

Employees would rather suffer a hangover or receive a credit card bill than talk to their boss, global survey shows

February 9, 2012 15:30 by Ann Pace

(From HRmagazine.co.uk) -- Leaders lack empathy with their staff, have poor leadership skills and that a third of them are ineffective, according to global research published this morning by talent management firm DDI.

The report found one in three respondents (34%) only sometimes or never consider their leader to be effective, and over a third (37%) are only sometimes or never motivated to give their best by their leader.
 
Lessons for Leaders from the People Who Matter includes data from an online survey undertaken for DDI by Harris Interactive.
 
This polled more than 1,250 full-time employees in non-management positions in the US, UK, Australia, Canada, China, India, Germany and South East Asia (Malaysia, Philippines and Singapore), and found they would rather suffer a bad hangover, do housework or see their credit card bill arrive in the mail than face the prospect of sitting through a performance discussion with their boss. And only 40% of respondents report that their boss never damages their personal self-esteem, leaving 60% saying they do sometimes, most of the time or always.

Read more.


Tags: , ,

Categories: International | News | Research